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Studying the material remains of past human life and activities may not seem important or exciting to the average Joe unlike the biological sciences.But archaeology’s aim to understand mankind is a noble endeavor that goes beyond uncovering buried treasures, gathering information, and dating events.History, anthropology, and archaeology are three distinct but closely related bodies of knowledge that tell man of his present by virtue of his past.Historians can tell what cultures thrived in different regions and when they disintegrated.Therefore, today the degree of pinkness in the bathtub’s water is not changing.In this analogy, the red ink represents carbon-14 that forms in the upper atmosphere at the rate of 21 pounds per year and spreads throughout the biosphere.Archaeology has undoubtedly enriched mankind’s history like no other science.

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Uncalibrated radiocarbon measurements are usually reported in years BP where 0 (zero) BP is defined as AD 1950.

Radiocarbon dating, which is used to calculate the age of certain organic materials, has been found to be unreliable, and sometimes wildly so - a discovery that could upset previous studies on climate change, scientists from China and Germany said in a new paper.

Their recent analysis of sediment from the largest freshwater lake in northeast China showed that its carbon clock stopped ticking as early as 30,000 years ago, or nearly half as long as was hitherto thought.

Calibration is not only done before an analysis but also on analytical results as in the case of radiocarbon dating—an analytical method that identifies the age of a material that once formed part of the biosphere by determining its carbon-14 content and tracing its age by its radioactive decay.

Carbon-14 is a naturally occurring isotope of the element carbon.